Friday Oct 20, 2017, 15:58 GMT
Pandapen





Sponsored links
You can promote your product at this space.
Information at:
www.cyaccess.com
You can promote your product at this space.
Information at:
www.cyaccess.com


If you like AZbb, please rate it!
HotScripts.com
ScriptSearch.com
Scripts.com
Den of inanity
The Ivory Tower  (Topics: 304 - Posts: 1,820)
Page  1
Let the right one in
Posted by Monika Oct 4, 2009, 08:18
Have you seen the film Letthe right one in? . It's a Swedish vampire film, and it's excellent.

As I read it, it's about the Shadow of Sweden - the Foreigner. The horrible, the strange and the rejected but at the same time - part of the Swedish soul, one that's been there since the French arrived in Sweden, at least.


Posted by Carduus Oct 4, 2009, 10:00
No, I haven't seen it or read it.


Perhaps I should... I've never been a fan of vampire stories until The Evil Lord Sunjumper here recommended True Blood onto which I now am hooked. [ooh]


[:-p]


Posted by Igelkotten Oct 4, 2009, 10:16
I haven't seen it, nor read the book, but considerign how many people that tell me it is really good, I really ought to do so. I know that Tom liked the film, and has been around most of Blackeberg where the movie was shot and looked at the real locations. Maybe he has some interestign thoughts on the film, being sort of an outsider to Sweden himself?

From what I have seen of trailers for the film, it does seem to be quite a bit of retro-nostaliga about growing up in the seventies.


Posted by Sunjumper Oct 4, 2009, 14:05
I heard about the film some time ago.
But I never managed to see it in the cinema, if it was shown in the cinemas at all that is.
And I also heard that it was really good.
I saw a short sequence from he film (was it a trailer?) not knowing anything about it and it was pretty effective and also creepy in a way few vampire films are. Maybe because I did not expect it to be about vampires, much less one that looks like a child.

Now I will have to hunt it down and have a look.


Posted by Monika Oct 5, 2009, 08:24
Please tell about your impressions and ideas when you have seen the film - I'm very curious how other Swedes see it - and how non-Swedish viewers react.

This film made me realize just how Swedish I am, no matter if I live there or not, the whole nightmare dream is part of my imagination too.

But also, I'm totally Polish. I wonder what the symbolic representation of the Polish Shadow would be. It would have to do with a kind of mystical, mythical Jewishness-as-imagined-by-a-Pole, maybe some kind of mage? He would have to be scary of course, but also darkly attractive.


Posted by Egil Oct 5, 2009, 14:22
I watched it last year, as a very pleasing finish to the big kino festival. And loved it to bits.

I'd say that the foreigner is only part of what makes it ring - the other part being a very cool, very nasty subversion of modern vampire and kid representations. When you realize, halfway to the movie, that the crazy guy is what Our Hero will become, it sends quite a chill down your spine. Der Kleine Vampir this isn't.


Posted by TomC Oct 5, 2009, 17:44
To be really honest, I found it a bit surreal.

Not in terms of script or anything, but because I sort of know the area, watching various scenes made me think "oh, that's the bridge at so-and-so". Having subsequently bought the book, I was right that to some of the locations I imagined were the the locations the film makers intended me to think they were. It's even more surreal to visit them (though I haven't done this in the Winter - yet!)

I was also able to advise my fellow cinema-goer (who dragged me there) on the Swedish used, including when the spoken word differs from the subtitles, which is something I tend not to like with foreign language films.

There is a definate feel of Blackeberg, and Stockholm as I guess it would have been in the 1980s in both the film and the book.
All in all, I would thoroughly recommend it.


Posted by TomC Oct 29, 2009, 22:02
An update.

I have finally finished the book.
I have to admit there were more than a few places I recognised thoughout the story - places that I could picture the events happening in my mind's eye. Even Igelkotten and Carduus' suburb gets a mention - and that I really did find a bit surreal.

For those who have seen the film, I will say that the book is somewhat darker and certain elements did not make it into the screenplay.


Posted by Monika Nov 3, 2009, 16:31
worth reading? in Swedish or English?


Posted by TomC Nov 3, 2009, 21:18
Definitely worth reading - though I only attempted it in English.


Posted by Egil Nov 16, 2009, 19:23
I have rewatched it, and come up with a very short way of explaining what I think about it: it's a movie about struldbruggs.

BTW, does the girl speak with any kind of foreign accent?


Posted by Egil Nov 16, 2009, 19:25
And: do the characters' names have any noticeable connotations of class or nationality?


Posted by Monika Nov 17, 2009, 15:38
Quoted from: Egil

I have rewatched it, and come up with a very short way of explaining what I think about it: it's a movie about struldbruggs.


just one of them in that case


BTW, does the girl speak with any kind of foreign accent?

No, but (s)he (it's a androgyne) looks distinctly foreign, it's an archetypical foreignness in Scandinavian culture: could be French, Jewish, Spanish - generally a "southern" look.
Her/his name confirms that, it's foreign in the same archetypical way.


Posted by Monika Nov 17, 2009, 15:43
Quoted from: Egil

And: do the characters' names have any noticeable connotations of class or nationality?


Eli sounds foreign but also classical in some way, a foreignness that is so intertwined with Swedishness that it also could signify aristocratic provenance. After all, lots of Swedish aristocracy was "imported" from more southern lands.

Oskar is a Scandinavian name, I reckon that spelled with a "c" it could also be vaguely upper class (do you agree with this, Igelkotten?). Most iof the other characters bear working class names.


Posted by Egil Nov 17, 2009, 18:17
I didn't mean literally that any character was a struldbrugg (I guess this proves that, like most, my one-line explanation doesn't work [grin] ), but that it is about showing how horrible several "romantic" notions (about kids, vampires, vampire kids, and not growing up) can be. Even the fact that they don't dispel the characters' romance only adds to the horror of the whole situation (especially when you imagine little Oskar with an acid-eaten face circa 2015).

Of course, the effect becomes even stronger when you visit mom for the weekend and your sister in law is watching "Twilight" on the telly.


Posted by Monika Nov 18, 2009, 08:42
Interestingly, access.denied had similar impressions of the film.


Posted by Igelkotten Dec 8, 2009, 23:45
Quoted from: Monika

Quoted from: Egil

And: do the characters' names have any noticeable connotations of class or nationality?


Eli sounds foreign but also classical in some way, a foreignness that is so intertwined with Swedishness that it also could signify aristocratic provenance. After all, lots of Swedish aristocracy was "imported" from more southern lands. .


While not a common name, there were certainly quite a few people named Eli around the turn of the last century. One of the more notable ones were probably Eli Hecksher, a noted historian and practicioner of political economy -a heavyweight in Swedish political and economic thought for quite a while, and still quite readable.

Quoted from: Monika

[
Oskar is a Scandinavian name, I reckon that spelled with a "c" it could also be vaguely upper class (do you agree with this, Igelkotten?). Most iof the other characters bear working class names.


Oh, certainly. After all, we had two kings named Oscar-with-C, but on the headstones of the graves in the rural parish where we have our family burial plot, there are any number of farmers named Oskar-with-K.


Forum Information
Users browsing this page: 1 [1 Guest]

Powered by: AZbb 1.0.04 © 2004 AZ. All Rights Reserved. In: 0.108 sec.